Day 2, Leg 3, 2012-2013 Winter Motorcycle Adventure

Friday, March 1, 2013

After a quick breakfast at the hotel in Hobbs, my sweetheart (SH) and I continued East on Hwy 180, starting the day dressed warmer than yesterday’s start, including the addition of chaps, a neck-warmer and my light down jacket under my armored jacket for me, and winter gloves and light jacket as a liner for my sweetheart. The sun is warm, but when we start out in the high 30-degree levels, the wind is chilly, even for these Minnesotans!

We stopped in Lamesa at a Mexican family restaurant to warm up / snack / coffee break. Then we continued on Hwy 180, enjoying the changing landscape that includes desert, oil, hills, mountains, some trees, increasing agriculture and ranching – and long stretches with a whole lot of nothing! We always seem to find the beauty in our travels, even in the desolation of sparsely populated, remote areas that include long, pancake flat stretches of straight highway. Loving 75 mph posted speed limits.

It’s a windy today, and the fields of windmills near Albany are good indicators that my arms will ache by the end of the day from balancing the bike against the gusty northwest breezes. Although it is the windiest little city, I love Albany, TX, population about 2,000! It appears to be a much more affluent town than Snyder or Lamesa. We had a latte at a very cute and historic drug store, shopped for souvenirs in a gift shop, where we chatted with a charming store clerk (who gave me a postage stamp for my postcard to SH’s Uncle Walter).

We didn’t take the time to visit the Old Jailhouse Art Center, but the lady in the Chamber of Commerce was eager to tell us all about it. If I were to move to a small town in Texas, I would be likely to choose Albany!

The Ridge Motel in Breckenridge, TX, is our stopping point for the night. I collapsed for a short nap, and was tempted to stay there all night, until my empty stomach convinced me to get up. We walked over to Ernie’s Spanish Kitchen for dinner, where SH had a burritto and I had a delicious rib-eye steak. It can be tricky finding gluten-free food in the boonies. The servers often look at me like I’m speaking Chinese when I ask whether a dish is gluten-free!  I usually stick to eggs, salads and grilled meats, for the most part, on our travels.

The server was an energetic, sincere woman who must have had close to the same circumference and height measurements. The people in outstate Texas have been just delightful, hospitable, and interesting.

After our second 250-mile plus day in chilly, windy temps, I think I was sleeping before my head hit the pillow.  Tomorrow will find us back in the city.

Love, Tomboy Tam

All gain, no pain – diary of a mid-life Celiac diagnosis

I never saw it coming – the significant weight gain in the months after I stopped eating gluten (products with wheat, barley and rye ingredients or contamination). So while the pain and life-changing symptoms of Celiac disease subsided, my relief was marred by a swift transition out of my jeans and into sweat pants!

The dietician I consulted following my Celiac diagnosis said that weight gain is common after Celiacs ditch gluten.  Primarily because once the small intestine recovers from the damage caused by gluten, it starts absorbing the food instead of . . . well, you can imagine “instead of!”

In other words, I had become accustomed to eating larger quantities than a healthy body should need in order to maintain or lose weight, as I had been. The “significant” part of the gain was active denial. I was eating healthy foods! I had given up bread, pasta, most desserts and my favorite German comfort foods! I had recently started working out regularly! I couldn’t be gaining weight – it’s not fair! Maybe my personal and family history of thyroid issues caused it!

So it went for 21 months, 30 pounds and a few half-hearted attempts to get the situation under control.

About six weeks ago, I finally tackled head-on the current reality of how my body is wired. I chose to make my wellness a priority to ensure my physical condition can keep up with the active lifestyle I enjoy so much. I intend to be an active, adventurous 100-year-old tomboy! That will only be possible if I am an active, adventurous and healthy 53-year-old.

It’s not rocket science. My renewed commitment to wellness includes an app, food, exercise and support:

MyFitnessPal.com – a free but priceless online and mobile app that tracks calories, exercise and nutritional information. In my opinion, its features and usability are better than a well-know membership program I subscribed to for several months.

Nutrition – in addition to strictly eliminating gluten, I eat very little processed food, choose organic whenever possible and maintain a balance of veggies, protein, fruit and carbs, in about that order of quantities (also tracked by MyFitnessPal). I also consult with Dr. Tom at Spicer Wellness on a regimen of natural supplements that has helped rebalance my body’s systems and give my metabolism a good swift kick-start. And I cook and bake more of my meals myself, so I know exactly what I’m eating and can enjoy the occasional treat.

Exercise – I’ve committed to working out at least 30 minutes, five times a week. Some days it’s a half hour walk or dancing in my living room. At least once a week it’s 30 minutes of Krank Cycle and 60 minutes of Reformer Pilates at Revolution Cycle and Fitness. I work out because it supports my lifestyle, not because I love working out. However, I do like how it makes me feel – strong, in control of my body, sexy and proud that I am in the best physical condition of my adult life.

Support – several of my family members share our wellness successes and challenges and cheer each other on through an email chain. MyFitnessPal also has a social media feature that allows me to add friends, get updates on their progress and comment on them. And my sweetheart consistently supports and participates in my menu and workout choices.

Gaining perspective, not pounds

When I approached my fitness program from the perspective of what I want to GAIN (active lifestyle and feeling good) instead of what I want to LOSE  (extra pounds, tight clothing, etc.) I became much more positive and started thinking about what I could do, instead of what I could not. Seems like such a simple shift in mindset wouldn’t matter much, but the jeans I wore yesterday tell a different story!  I’ll soon be saying “Good-bye sweat pants!”

  • What activities or lifestyle benefits have you gained (or do you want to gain) from wellness priorities?
  • What tips and tools can you share for supporting your wellness program?

I’ve got some tomboy fun to plan and a suitcase to pack – catch you later!

Love, Tomboy Tam